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12 September 2006 @ 11:39 pm
You dig. I dig. We all dig together.  

FAKE  -- I re-read volume one for the first time in two years. I like it a lot more now than then, when I was a bit 'sophistry and illusion, consign it to the flames!' (ie 'not enough boysmut'). Since then I've read enough boysmut to launch a ... a ship full of porn, so the plot and extra characters were a good deal more welcome. It's a shame that there's little chance of me finding anything other than volume seven shoved into the back of a shelf in Other Realms with a twenty euro price tag. I'll never know if Ryo and Dee get busy.

Euro -- this is not a plural. You can have one euro and one cent, or you can have one million euro and one million cent (I wish I did). This has been annoying me since Beer Fest, and probably before then. Look, I know it's stupid that there's no S, but there's undoubtedly a good reason for it ...  no, actually, it'll be a daft and pointless reason but the fact is, the paucity of pluralism is correct. Don't piss off the Monetary Union, yo. One day we will pwn your asses.

Writing -- yes, I'm having that cyclical slump. Compounded by the fact that I have precisely one week and a half before I start college again and I'm desperate to get the two fest fics at least well started before then. That very need is holding me back. Also not helping: my abrupt shift in style, where I'm writing frilly frothy little things that barely scrape past the 5000 word mark. Those big fics? Are EXHAUSTING. I feel they're the only way of breaking through in fandom and I don't want to abandon them, yet I really do not have the energy or compulsion right now. Maybe it is gone forever. I don't know. I do not like being too scared to write, I can tell you that much.

Feedback -- I haven't been leaving much lately. This is due to limited online time -- I have to bookmark things and I tend to lose the impetus to comment when not actually connected. Intend to rectify this when I have a constant connection. It makes me feel like a heel.

College -- Only a week and a half till broadband. And, er, even more work. Bit of a double-edged sword, that. What scares me about Junior Doctors is not the horrible hours or Ore-sama consultants but the lack of time. Time for me. My writing. Even term-time severely limits that because I'm so damn tired all the time, and I must needs prioritise -- study has to come first, like it or not. (Not.) I know I'll be able to handle being an intern, but if push comes to shove I don't know if I'll want to handle it. And forty-five million other employed people say: So what?

Books -- I fail to see why The Color Purple got such critical acclaim. I'm not that stupid -- I know the grammar is purposely skew-wiff. Yet the shocking bits didn't shock me, and the ending made me go WTF? Then again, my knowledge of American history is thus: you threw some tea in the ocean, there were Indians, you weren't very nice to black people, and you put flags everywhere. For all I know American apartheid wasn't even over when the book was published, thus explaining its pertinence at the time. Also finished: Shadow of the Giant, finally. In about three hours, which made me headsick. Response: WHAT? WHAT? WHAT? Seriously -- what? And now, my lovely David Gemmell, Heroes in the Shadows. Should write an essay about how heroes are made not born, forged in adversity, and are almost always reluctant, but can't be arsed. My meta blows. 

RPGs -- 3 years in fandom, and I have yet to a) entirely figure out what these are and b) fathom the appeal. It's all very Fight Club, too. If you aren't down with a or b, NOBODY will tell you.

 
 
Current Location: digging
Current Mood: quixoticquixotic
Current Music: Saturday Night (Bon Jovi)
 
 
 
...: [Brideshead Revisited] C/Schowburger on September 12th, 2006 11:19 pm (UTC)
Amen on the euro thing. The best thing ever what when those crack-y ringtone ads used to say "only six yo-yos" for some unfathomable reason; it made my brain bleed.

Is David Gemmell actually good? The shelves and shelves of his similar-looking books in Easons kind of lead me to think that his writing must be utter tripe (of course, then I turn around and browse the Discworld section quite happily...).
...chowburger on September 12th, 2006 11:19 pm (UTC)
And it is quite obviously supposed to say 'was' and not 'what' in the second sentence.
every Starbucks should have a polar bearscoradh on September 12th, 2006 11:25 pm (UTC)
[shudders] I didn't even want to mention the yo-yo thing, for fear the madness would spread. It's just ... why? Why would you refer to money that way? WHHHYYY?

The quick answer to that is yes. Then again, I haven't read a vast amount of his stuff. Tell you what: try Morningstar. It's one of my favourite books ever -- not just by him -- and if you find that doesn't suit, then the rest probably won't either.

of course, then I turn around and browse the Discworld section quite happily...).

No longer an option for me ... I've read every single Pratchett book by now. Woe. :(
...chowburger on September 12th, 2006 11:35 pm (UTC)
I assumed I was just hearing things the first time I saw the ad - I apparently have too much faith in humanity...

Okay, I shall put faith in your literary taste and have a look for it next time I go to the library. If I ever go again, that is! I'm becoming illiterate when it comes to anything but fic! I am never going to survive an English degree! Aah!

I think I have about three Pratchett books I haven't read at this stage. I don't want to be finished all of them, I like having the option of picking one up when everything else I'm reading seems to be crap.
And sure there's a new one coming out in the next month or two :)
every Starbucks should have a polar bearscoradh on September 12th, 2006 11:38 pm (UTC)
I don't -- one of my friends used to say it. And she worked in a shop, this primed to spread the disease far and wide. EVIL.

An arts student, eh? Never mind, no one expects you to read books. (I live with two of them, I know these things.) You already have Converse, right? And you've seen the OC? Sorted! :P (Yes, I am only messing. Sort of.)

I know what you mean; I was like that for a while, but eventually the temptation grew too strong!

Excellent -- I hope it's not another Wee Free Men book though. They are massively irritating.
...: [Road to El Dorado] Thud.chowburger on September 12th, 2006 11:49 pm (UTC)
Mm, 'cause the world really needs another person with an arts degree... I will never handle the reading, so the not being expected to could come in handy - I only actually read the books I studied for the LC after the exam... I could definitely handle the Converse-wearing and TV-watching, though :)

Ahem, sorry.
I want another Rincewind book, damn it! Or a Watch one.
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: Footballscoradh on September 12th, 2006 11:53 pm (UTC)
I really wouldn't worry about that. If I were you, I'd do it for the learning, not the degree. That way you'll come out with more than just a bit of paper. Then again, I'm doing something so stupidly hard that it has the highest suicide rate of all professions, what can I say? :D

Ah, bugger.

He did say that he couldn't do much more with Rincewind -- a coward who knows it. (I beg to differ, but yeah.) Angua has to get pregnant or something soon. I love little Sam, though. Or rather, what he does to big Sam. ♥
(Deleted comment)
every Starbucks should have a polar bearscoradh on September 12th, 2006 11:58 pm (UTC)
[ponders] That only took me a few hours to read, too. It wasn't exactly difficult, you know the way Salman Rushdie is. Then again, the Life of Pi is burning me from across the room. I think it's the maths term putting me off. :(

Still four years away, but I worry for Ireland. ♥
jehnt: infernal affairs - endjehnt on September 13th, 2006 02:06 am (UTC)
FAKE is my favorite manga. I dunno why, I just liiiiike it. I have some trouble telling the characters apart though. I'm like, "uh, so the dude with the dark hair hits on the dude with the light hair, then there's the dude with the medium-colored hair and--" and I get confused. But I still really like it.

Euro is plural? I DID NOT KNOW THAT. This is because in America we have dollarS, so I think we (and the makers of Beer Fest!) assume that you stick an S on 'euro' to make it plural.

I hate the writing slump. I am in kind of an everything-slump lately. Everything except studying. Its so terrible.

College: I have figured out that I need three hours of me-time per day. This is non-negotiable. If I have to cut back on sleep to do it, then I have to cut back on sleep. If I don't get it, I go insaaaaaane. This, unfortunately, somewhat cramps my style, given that I often have to choose between homework and socializing. And, well, I tend to usually choose the homework.

my knowledge of American history is thus: you threw some tea in the ocean, there were Indians, you weren't very nice to black people, and you put flags everywhere.

That's mostly it. I, of course, believe it's also good to remember the Alamo. Okay, I don't quite know WHAT we're supposed to remember about the Alamo, but everyone agrees that it's very important.

And man, I don't get RPGs either. They seem to involve a lot of effort. Like, A LOT. I'd probably completely forget about it and leave everyone else in the lurch. :-/
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: Banana headscoradh on September 13th, 2006 08:40 pm (UTC)
Dark hair = seme. Light hair = uke. I don't know if dark hair makes you a seme, or semes are born with dark hair, but that is the short and short of it. :D

Assuming makes an ass of you and me. [innocent face] I guess the whole world assumes that -- I'm guessing that some of the languages in the monetary union don't use S for plural, hence the more universal non-pluralism.

Yeah ... I learned some diagrams of the eye today. I feel so accomplished. (And it does help to know where all the goram muscles ARE.)

The Alamo was ... some kind of battle? With Ben Hur in it, and Gettysburg? Pray enlighten me. I feel I've got some facts wrong, here.

Totes. Writing for fest deadlines is bad enough -- especially for me, especially right now. I've gone into complete denial actually. Fests? What, I signed up for no fests ...
jehnt: supermanjehnt on September 13th, 2006 10:34 pm (UTC)
semes and dark hair = the NEW chicken and the egg!

You know what the creepiest muscles in the body are? FOREHEAD MUSCLES. Those just scare me, for some reason. Eyes are fascinating. Last year in psychology we dissected a cow eye, and that was cool. Some peope couldn't do it right and just poked it with the scalpel and got shot with a jet of fluid. Good times.

Short version of this history lesson:

The Alamo was a battle in the Texan war for independence where all 200 or so Texan defenders got slaughtered by the Mexican army.
Gettysburg is in Pennsylvania, and thus wasn't involved in the Alamo at all. It was, however, the site of a battle in the Civil War, and the location of Abe Lincoln's Gettysburg Address.

Longer and more entertaining (or so I think) version:

The Alamo had Davy Crockett (he wore a 'coonskin cap, and you remember him by the song "Ballad of Davy Crockett," which goes like this: *sings* "DAAAAAAAAAAVY Crockett, KING OF THE WILD FRONTIEEEEEEEEEEEER!" It also explains how he killed a bear when he was three and later served in Congress and fixed up the government and the laws as well, before striding off into the sunset. It is emblematic of many traditional American values: tuneless music, killing bears, killing injuns [note: this is a now-politically-incorrect way to refer to the group known alternately as "American Indians" or "Native Americans"], killing things in general, fixing up the law [note: this has since fallen out of favor], and riding off into the sunset with a gun.) and Jim Bowie (inventor of the BOWIE KNIFE, so you know he was badass) and they got killed by Santa Anna, who was later tragically defeated by Sam Houston, who was is famous for having a really fucking large statue of himself outside the city of Houston (this statue was the largest in the state of Texas until the Dallas Zoo built an extraordinarily tall giraffe statue). While kicking Santa Anna's ass, Sam Houston's troops used the battle cry "Remember the Alamo!" and this was so inspiring that the smaller and presumably less-disciplined Texan army was able to kill around 600 or so of Santa Anna's men while only losing about ten of their own (WHAT THE FUCK, MAN, THOSE ARE WILD NUMBERS). So I suppose we're supposed to remember the Alamo as this very dramatic and awe-inspiring last stand, but I've always thought it was kind of depressing.

And all you really need to know about Gettysburg is that's where Lincoln gave the Gettysburg address, which began "Four score and seven years ago..." Theoretically there is more to this, but that's the only bit taught in history classes.
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: So ... yeahscoradh on September 14th, 2006 07:28 pm (UTC)
I love this one: corrugator supercilii. It's so awesome: supercilii just means eyebrows or something -- a corrugator of eyebrows! Sheesh, this latin thing is a breeze. :P

how he killed a bear when he was three and later served in Congress

Just the way you linked those two made me sporfle! Kill a bear, come to Congress! Ideal qualifications! No prior experience needed! [rolls about]

Statues of giraffes? I love it. Dublin is famous (?) for its spike. Yes. A huge mofo spike of some ugly metal. Or maybe plastic. And every time the wind blows hard it nearly falls over. I don't think Cork even has statues ... let me think ... no.

"Four score and seven years ago..."

Buzzah? Four score years ago what? This makes me worry a little for the American nation, if teachers are content to let kids know just that much. When I was in sixth class we had to learn the entire declaration of independance! In IRISH!

v. amused.
4rightchords_ on September 15th, 2006 12:46 am (UTC)
four score and seven years ago our forefathers set forth upon this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. we are now engaged in a great civil war, testing whether this nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. we are met on a battlefield of this war and that's all I know.

gettysburg address, man. one of the greatest pieces of oratory ever.

... do you know irish? ::wibble::
every Starbucks should have a polar bearscoradh on September 15th, 2006 08:12 pm (UTC)
All men ... but not all women. Nice one, Abe. (Or whoever made that speech.)

... do you know irish? ::wibble::

Good grief no. I don't do well with being force-fed education.
4rightchords_ on September 15th, 2006 08:17 pm (UTC)
abraham lincoln indeed. not a great period in history for women's lib, I'll grant you.

Good grief no. I don't do well with being force-fed education.
mmm. understandable. is it compulsory?
jehnt: bsg - six - windsweptjehnt on September 15th, 2006 02:40 am (UTC)
I have never heard of this Dublin spike thing. It sounds ... spiky.

And, eh, the state of American education in general is pretty crappy. You have to read the stuff, but you never have to actually know it. It's why the country's going to the dogs. No one understands anything. Horribly sad, that. Oh, America.
Melanie: HYDE } Rock on4am_secret on September 13th, 2006 02:50 am (UTC)
RPGs -- 3 years in fandom, and I have yet to a) entirely figure out what these are and b) fathom the appeal. It's all very Fight Club, too. If you aren't down with a or b, NOBODY will tell you.

Ahaha, that is the BEST way to describe them ever. :)
every Starbucks should have a polar bearscoradh on September 13th, 2006 08:08 pm (UTC)
:D Love the icon!
Melanie: HYDE } *smirk*4am_secret on September 20th, 2006 06:13 pm (UTC)
Haha, thanks!
hikaridonya on September 13th, 2006 08:46 am (UTC)
Right. Lets get to replying x3;

FAKE: I love this. I have all the volumes, and um. Yes. If you ever get totally desperate to buy them, I suggest going to ebay. They have them cheap on there :D You really should finish it though. Sooooo good.

Books: Colour Purple = ditto. I mean, what the fuck?! I studied this at AS Level, and it was the most boringly painful book I've read in a long time. I wanted to cry. I am also aware that the grammar was meant to be skew-wiff, but the book as a whole made me want to dig my eyes out with a rusty spoon. I actually spent the first two weeks writing over the original text in pencil with things I thought would make it sound better. Um. Then I just got bored and turned the characters into Dragons, Elves, and other such assorted beings. I think my version was much better xD;

David... Gemmell... *bursts into sobs* Whhhhhhy? He was meant to carry on writing for years and years and years ;______________________________________;

RPGs: *dies laughing* Um. As in Livejournal RPGs? Right. Lets see how to explain this. Someone comes up with a - usually - AU plot idea (much like fanfiction) but instead of writing a story, sets up a community, shoves the plot idea out into the world, asks people to pick up characters to play as... and then you go wild. Often loads of fun, and inspiring :D I enjoy it anyway.
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: Chuck Norrisscoradh on September 13th, 2006 08:35 pm (UTC)
I'm totally pining for more Dee/Ryo action. (Or is it Ryo/Dee?!! The questions, the questions!) I have great plans for my first paycheck -- it's all going to be blown on manga in one foul swoop of Amazon or similar. Until then, I must make do with yaoi daily. Only two more weeks! After four months of deprivation. Eeee.

[SPOILER ALERT] What I didn't get was ... everything. It had a happy ending. The strange bits with the sister -- it reminded me of the random crack in the middle of Number 9 Dream, which totally ruined that book (imo). And the whole lesbian relationship that everyone was just okay with?! Shades of Sarah Waters. Not good ones, either. If it had been set in Greenwich Village or San Fran or something, but no. Deep South. Bible Belt. In conclusion: WTF? (Actually a question -- if you studied it, surely you should know what the hell she was trying to achieve with it? The bit at the end about her medium and spirits or whatever freaked me out a good bit, too.)

OMG GEMMELL! I never realised he was dead!!! I cannot believe it wasn't on the news or the flist or something. [cries] What does the fantasy world have now? A Robin Hobb who's gone off the rails and a George RR who's lost his mojo! It's TRAGIC.

So RPGs are like ... soap operas? Ah, that explains my lack of attraction to them. I hate soap operas. Rather, I hate the way they never end. Also, I remember going to nocturne_alley and being totally bewildered. That impression has not yet changed. :D
Zilch. Zero. Nothing. Nada.inmyth on September 13th, 2006 11:49 am (UTC)
Fake: Haven't read it *sigh*...yet.

Euro: No idea about it, we deal with pounds. RAWR. Heeee.

Writing: I think it's slump season, haven't written anything significant for ages nor have read anything either THOUGH OMG I have bookmarked a couple of your epics ...just haven't gotten round to them yet.

College: Mine starting as well from 18th. Liverpool: Mechanical/Aerospace Engineering. I'm going to be a Uni student, what! I feel...mature I think.

Books: The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. I can't rec this enough, I had almost devoured this gem in my 7 hour flight from London to Dubai - it was gorgeous and beautiful and captivating and just READ IT! Also, I've started reading The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova - another brilliant book if you're into historical fiction like I am.

RPG: Oh my. They're fun but can be downright stupid at times if the people can't work together as has happened countless times before. You choose a character from the fandom or make one up if the community allows and then create a journal for this character like you'd do for yourself and basically start role playing. Assume the character and Bob's your uncle. In case you're interested, go check this one out nothing_goldrpg. I heard of it from wook77 and looks quite promising.
every Starbucks should have a polar bearscoradh on September 13th, 2006 08:22 pm (UTC)
Good luck with your course! Uni hasn't done anything towards making me feel more mature, but really I think I'm a lost cause by now.

Thanks for the book rec, too. I'm always on the lookout for new material.

Eh, roleplay sounds like too much of a time committment for me. And I still think I'd rather write a story than pretend to be in one! :D
a work in progress: james marsden: as cyclopswintersjuly on September 13th, 2006 01:58 pm (UTC)
Ahh, I love Gemmell. Of course, every author bows down before Pratchett (with the possible exception of Tolkien, but that depends on taste), but gah - I remember Heroes in the Shadows. Loved it, wished there were more male protagonists like his ones around.

True. I still have no idea what happened in Fight Club; you'd think after so many years, someone'll tell me, but no, they all want me to actually go watch the thing.
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: Eggsscoradh on September 13th, 2006 09:06 pm (UTC)
I would agree on that, simply because Pratchett has this awesome insight into the human mind. It's clinical, almost. But Gemmell was good at what he did. He will be sadly missed.

They blew up some stuff. It was great. :D
Cait: buffy/angelcoralia13 on September 13th, 2006 03:59 pm (UTC)
Sorry about the writing thing, but it will come back to you. I think if you want to do something, and it remains interesting to you, it will come back. There was a while earlier this summer where I completely freaked out about writing - I would sit for two hours in front of my computer trying to drag a few more paragraphs on my monster Firefly fic out of me, and end up miserable and in bed by midnight. What worked for me was just taking a break; not trying to force it anymore. I spent a few nights watching DVDs instead of banging my head against my internal fanfic wall and I somehow got my groove back.

Also - American apartheid? Do you mean racial segregation? I guess that and apartheid are pretty much the same thing... I've never thought of it that way before. Well, you know what they say: vocabulary is written by the winners. When was The Color Purple written again? I'm pretty sure segregation was still going on then, since it only became (theoretically) illegal in, like, the '60s/early '70s. That book was one of my options for summer reading one year in high school, but I read Grapes of Wrath instead, probably because it has a funny title. It was not very funny.
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: Star qualityscoradh on September 13th, 2006 09:12 pm (UTC)
What worked for me was just taking a break; not trying to force it anymore. I spent a few nights watching DVDs instead of banging my head against my internal fanfic wall and I somehow got my groove back.

After all this time, I totally know what you're saying -- I usually end up doing that anyway, without necessarily choosing to (it's more of I WILL NEVER WRITE AGAIN, WOE, ANGST, DIE thing). I'm just horribly aware of how limited my time will be after college starts; I have this brilliant oppourtunity RIGHT NOW, and I can't take advantage of it! Woe.

Drinking from different fountains, using different buses and schools and shops ... can't really see the difference. Also know about this much about it in either country [makes very small space between finger and thumb]. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry and To Kill a Mockingbird supplied most of my info on the topic. :D

The Color Purple was written in 1983, made into a Spielberg film in 1985. It was set during the second world war, though. I was just wondering when those civil rights workers got shot -- if it was around that time, maybe it provoked the book? I don't know. Didn't study it, see, just picked it up in the library because I was severely short on choice.

Oh, honey. Did the word Wrath not give it away? [giggles] I've never read it -- would you recommend?
Cait: depressedcoralia13 on September 13th, 2006 10:04 pm (UTC)
The sad, actually really annoying part of this is that I've studied South African apratheid, and I've (obviously) studied American history, and I am still not able to tell you very much about this. I don't know if my opinion that South Africa was worse is accurate or just me being naive. I think a big difference is that officially sanctioned/instigated murders, rapes, and maimings were happening in SA on a scale that hadn't been seen in the US since the 1800s - and even then they weren't sanctioned by the government - local cops, yes; government officials, no. The segregation aspects were very similar, but the violence was different. Not to say that there's not still an inexcusable amount of hatred and injustice and prejudice in the US regarding race, but there was something about watching the SA trials that made my blood run cold.

Grapes of Wrath is good, although I still don't understand the reason for the title. I would recommend it, though it's long - six hundred pages, I think. But a quick read, anyway - I read it in six days when I was about fifteen. It's about farmers in the US during the Great Depression. Heavy stuff. It makes you want to volunteer at a soup kitchen.
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: Star qualityscoradh on September 14th, 2006 07:37 pm (UTC)
See, all I know about SA is Nelson Mandela. And I remember seeing a film with Sandra Bullock and Matthew McCounaughty in it, about the rape of a little black girl. I'm pretty sure it had a contemporary setting (couldn't vouch for it, though) but there were scenes with the Klu Klux Klan and stuff. Overall southern USA doesn't bring itself off very well in any aspect of its history. I'd nearly be wary of going there now, and I'm white.

It's about farmers in the US during the Great Depression.

I'm pretty sure I got a question on an extract in one of my exams. All about dust and wheat failure and tumbleweeds blowing past? Hmm. I think I'll stick with labouring through the Life of Pi for now. :D
Cait: sad chasecoralia13 on September 14th, 2006 11:05 pm (UTC)
Huh, I'm not sure what movie that would be... The KKK is still around - not as much as it was in the early 1900s, I'm happy to say, but yeah, still around and not just in the South. It's disgusting. I have no desire to set foot in the South, either, and I've learned since I started going to school in St. Louis that Missouri (the state in which St. Louis is) qualifies as the South - even the Northern part that has one of the US's major cities in it. I don't think I'd be hurt in the South, I just don't think I'd be happy.

There was a great deal of dust, etc. in GoW. I'm interested that it turned up on your exams! It is John Stienbeck, though - big name.
orangemike: religious leftorangemike on September 14th, 2006 12:10 am (UTC)
The murdered civil rights workers (I'm assuming you are referring to the murders of Liuzzo and of Chaney, Goodman and Schwerner) were in 1964 and 1965, almost two decades before the book was written or published. The major civil rights laws were all passed by 1969 or so. The ugliness of Jim Crow days was pretty much a matter of history by 1983 when The Color Purple came out.

As I understand it, the euro/cent non-plural is to have pan-lingual usage across the eurozone, so that you don't have euri/centi in Italy and euros/centos in Spain and euroes/centes in France and euroen/centen ? in Germany.
queencallipygosqueencallipygos on September 14th, 2006 01:50 pm (UTC)
(History geek from the U.S. here, found my way in through the Metaquotes post)

The ugliness of Jim Crow days was pretty much a matter of history by 1983 when The Color Purple came out.

On paper, yes. But socially, racism is unfortunately still very much, even today, a concern. The Jim Crow laws took care of the legalese, but there are still parts of the country, even today, where the law kind of looks the other way over racism. (I'm assuming those outside the U.S. didn't see any of the fundraising to support the Hurricane Katrina victims -- a minor scandal erupted after one such special when the rapper Kanye West, who was visibly shaken by what he'd seen in New Orleans, deviated from the script to give a scathing critique of racism in America, and wound things up by saying "George Bush doesn't care about black people!" He maybe was lashing out, but he certainly had reason to.)

Plus, The Color Purple was set in the early 20th Century, at a time when the Jim Crow laws were still in effect.
orangemikeorangemike on September 14th, 2006 07:29 pm (UTC)
On paper, yes. But socially, racism is unfortunately still very much, even today, a concern.... Plus, The Color Purple was set in the early 20th Century, at a time when the Jim Crow laws were still in effect.
I'm a historian currently working on U.S. history of that era (and an ex-Southerner who lives in the inner city); I know all that. I was just responding to the prior query as to whether the book's publication was contemporary with the murders of Liuzzo, etc.
queencallipygosqueencallipygos on September 14th, 2006 07:31 pm (UTC)
Ah, sorry. I think I confused you with someone else.
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: Doctor?scoradh on September 14th, 2006 07:32 pm (UTC)
rapper Kanye West, who was visibly shaken by what he'd seen in New Orleans, deviated from the script to give a scathing critique of racism in America, and wound things up by saying "George Bush doesn't care about black people!"

Yeah, that was on the news over here at one point. It didn't make big waves, presumably because Europe has a big sign over its airspace reading 'GEORGE BUSH IS A TWIT' in huge sparkly letters. Like, we all know that. It's the huge majority that voted for him in America that don't.

I don't know who Jim Crow was ... not sure I want to, either. [shudders] I wonder will people look back at us and think the past was so horrible, the way we do now?
queencallipygosqueencallipygos on September 14th, 2006 07:42 pm (UTC)
According to this, "Jim Crow" was a nickname applied to the laws enforcing racial segregation in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries in the U.S. The initial argument was that instead of mixing the two races, the powers that be would provide equal facilities for each race, but just separate them. Rather than having all children go to the one magnificent sparkling-clean school, if they wanted to have a sparkling-clean school just for white children, they could get away with keeping black children out if they came up with a second sparkling-clean school just for black children. They weren't preventing black children from going to school, they were giving them just as good a facility, but just doing it somewhere else. So that was okay, right? Right!

Of course, the theory was often very different from the practice, and the facilities designed for black people were not as good. Which was part of what lead to the Civil Rights movement.

"Jim Crow" was the name of a music hall song popular in the 19th Century, which was usually performed by a singer in blackface. The title character of the song gave these laws their nickname.
every Starbucks should have a polar bearscoradh on September 14th, 2006 07:50 pm (UTC)
I can remember quite clearly the scene from Roll of Thunder where it explains that the white kids have a huge yellow schoolbus and the black kids have to walk. It just ... amazes me, astonishes me, that white people could let this happen and excuse it to themselves. What it did to their souls or hearts or whatever I shudder to think.
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: Traffic jamscoradh on September 14th, 2006 07:16 pm (UTC)
I'm pretty sure that's the ones. I only know of them from a programme called Reeling In The Years, which does the Big Points of every year in Irish and world history (with exciting backing music!). So I guess The Color Purple was just written about the nasty times even further back.

Aha! I bet that's it. I knew there was something like that. Euri/centi sounds like some cracked anime pairing, too. Am vastly amused.
Lu (Not Your Average Retelling)elucreh on September 13th, 2006 06:32 pm (UTC)
Is this Metaquotable? Because what you know about Americans is hilarious...

*hugs for the slump* I adore your long, meaty fics, but don't be afraid to show us what else you got!
every Starbucks should have a polar bearscoradh on September 13th, 2006 08:26 pm (UTC)
I suppose it is, Metaquoteable that is. Then again, according to Eddie Izzard Americans know nothing about European history so we're all square. (Fifty years ago? Nobody was ALIVE then!)

What I've got is, like, 1000 words of my Smutmas fic. It's pathetic. [sigh-o]
SilentAurorsilentauror on September 13th, 2006 07:01 pm (UTC)
YES to the Euro thing! I'm a Canadian, and even I know that! When I went to Europe with a bunch of Canadians two years ago, they all drove me crazy. That and the endless need to tell each other just how much things "really" cost when converted from English pounds. (Just get over it!)

Long fics are exhausting. I've got into this habit of writing them, and not being in the middle of one is really nice, I must say. But now I've set up an expectation, apparently. *sigh*

I'm with you on The Color Purple and RPGs, too. :)
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: Cat with no handsscoradh on September 13th, 2006 09:17 pm (UTC)
That and the endless need to tell each other just how much things "really" cost when converted from English pounds. (Just get over it!)

[grinds teeth] I hate that habit with an abiding passion. It's like, dude. If you have twenty dollars and something costs twenty-five dollars, you can't afford it, no matter how much it is in euro or whatever! HELLO!?

I have set up an expectation too -- nothing like yours, though! -- but I'm starting to severely regret it. Still, it was the only way to go at the time.
SilentAurorsilentauror on September 13th, 2006 09:23 pm (UTC)
It didn't help that, at the time, the pound was nearly three times the Canadian dollar, but it sure gets old fast! When in Rome and all! You just have to think in whatever currency you're currently using.

Eh, you just have to do what the muses want, and if they want long, then you have to do long. :) I don't regret my long stories, and in a different way, it's nice to know that there are people who actively yearn for stories of any length of mine! But the expectation can be a bit burdensome at times, too.
queencallipygosqueencallipygos on September 14th, 2006 01:52 pm (UTC)
Hi,

A history and literature buff from the U.S. who wandered in from the Metaquotes post --

"For all I know American apartheid wasn't even over when the book was published, thus explaining its pertinence at the time."

On paper it was, but racism is still a big issue. Even among the powers that be, you still have people who subconsciously or subtly try to bend the law a little.

"Then again, my knowledge of American history is thus: you threw some tea in the ocean, there were Indians, you weren't very nice to black people, and you put flags everywhere."

Actually, that puts you ahead of the average U.S. citizen, even.
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: Banana headscoradh on September 14th, 2006 07:39 pm (UTC)
Ha, this seriously got metaquoted? For the win.

On paper it was, but racism is still a big issue. Even among the powers that be, you still have people who subconsciously or subtly try to bend the law a little.

Oh, I can tell that just from looking at the current administration. :D

Once upon a time, when I was in school, I could have told you lots of dates about the war of independence and written an essay about George Washington. Sadly, those days are past. I don't think I could even remember my Bismarck essays now, and he is my favourite historical character. ♥
Tiniest ranting sexpot trollop: Inui & Fuji seem so normal ^_^goldie on September 17th, 2006 09:07 am (UTC)
*goes through all your recent posts and is clearly a stalker ahaha* Just quickly on RPGs, yes. The appeal comes once you build in-jokes and relationships with other players' characters. It depends on how the game is run, but the one I'm in is multifandom and is based on your character actually having an LJ, same way you or I do. So you'd follow the game by reading the game community's flist. But it is a huge time commitment, because once you're hooked, you're hooked.

*loves playing her Fuji*
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: Cat with no handsscoradh on September 17th, 2006 09:44 pm (UTC)
Oh, but my posts are just that interesting! [strikes a pose]

The appeal comes once you build in-jokes and relationships with other players' characters.

Sounds good but for one thing -- what if you end up shipping with someone you don't ship? Like ... what's a ship I honestly don't like ... Sanada/Atobe or something?!

Considering I barely have time to write when I'm in college, I don't think RPGs would be an intelligent move pour moi. :D
Tiniest ranting sexpot trollopgoldie on September 17th, 2006 10:36 pm (UTC)
*snaps happily away* >D

If you're playing with people who play their characters well and a ship develops naturally then you end up liking it I guess :D. I know lots of people who ship Blaise/anyone because they've played him/her in games when there was no canon basis to ship him with anyone til book 6. If the interaction develops naturally and well in game then it's a beautiful thing. Right now I'm playing Fuji/Inui which I adore, and even though I liked them as a ship already, the game's added extra depth to it for me. They make lots of geeky cryptic puns and it's terribly musing :D.

But yes, definitely not good if you have no time. It's not that it's a drag, it's just horribly addictive. You don't WANT to stop, heh.