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19 April 2009 @ 08:49 pm
#17  
Siddhartha, Herman Hesse

Or, as I came to know him, Shitheadtha.



He saw people living in a childish or animal-like way, which he both loved and despised. He saw them toiling, saw them suffer and grow grey about things that to him did not seem worth the price - for money, small pleasures and trivial honours. [...] he saw them lament over pains at which the Samana laughs, and suffer at deprivations which a Samana does not feel.

Yes, because this is what SAMANAS do - or at least, Siddhartha-the-Samana does:

FATHER CHILDREN AND ABANDON THEM
LETS HIS PARENTS DIE ALONE WITHOUT EVER LETTING THEM KNOW HIS WHEREABOUTS OR SAYING GOODBYE
ALLOWS HIS ELEVEN-YEAR-OLD - ELEVEN ELEVEN ELEVEN - SON TAKE OFF TO GOD KNOWS WHERE BECAUSE HE DOESN'T LIKE LIVING IN A FUCKING HUT, AND DOESN'T BOTHER LOOKING FOR HIM, BRINGING HIM BACK AND WORKING ON THEIR RELATIONSHIP BECAUSE THAT'S NOT 'WHAT THE BOY WANTS' AND HEAVEN KNOWS WE SHOULD BOW TO THE WHIMS OF PRE-PUBESCENTS IN ALL THINGS
- IE, HE IS LAZY AND CRAP.

Plus, hypocrite! He becomes one of these animals who likes money, pleasure and honour. WHOOPS. Then he tries to cover it up by pretending he planned it all along and goes and rows boats for the rest of his life. How's that for a five-year plan?

Not to mention the Samanas and the monks and EVERYONE pissed me off because they were talking about escaping from suffering, but they knew fuck all about it. Who suffered? I'll tell you who suffered. The poor bastards who worked the fields and grasped tiny chances of happiness with others through love and sex and having way too many children and were trapped in a cycle of poverty and toil, all so the bloody monks could grab a free meal off them whenever they felt like it. In exchange for what? Wandering around wearing yellow? Nice job if you can get it!

He saw that the water continually flowed and flowed and yet was always there; it was always the same and yet every moment it was new. Who could understand, concieve this?

UM, ME? It's not the same water. The bits under and around the water - banks and so on - don't move, the water does, it is replaced by other water, MYSTERY SOLVED.



Previously, on Book Glomp 2009:
He Knew He Was Right, Anthony Trollope
The Bostonians, Henry James
For Whom the Bell Tolls, Ernest Hemingway
For Esme - with Love and Squalor, JD Salinger
The Outsider, Albert Camus
The Princess Diaries: Ten out of Ten, Meg Cabot
The Vicar of Bullhampton, Anthony Trollope
Molesworth, Geoffrey Willans
Villette, Charlotte Bronte
The Portrait of a Lady, Henry James
The Way of All Flesh, Samuel Butler
Cecilia, Fanny Burney
The Catcher in the Rye, JD Salinger
The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Muriel Spark
Breakfast of Champions, Kurt Vonnegut
Valley of the Dolls, Jacqueline Susann
 
 
 
peripatetic extemporizations: Brendon PEACEhatoyona on April 19th, 2009 08:03 pm (UTC)
I have to say, reading these are pretty much the highlight of my day so far. I adore your sarcasm and anger!! :)
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: Art: daisiesscoradh on April 20th, 2009 08:35 pm (UTC)
hahaha, thanks? I think? I think it's more indignation than anything, and maybe a little worry that all the people praising these books on their back covers are getting something I'm not...
peripatetic extemporizationshatoyona on April 20th, 2009 09:10 pm (UTC)
No that was definitely a compliment! I like how well you can express that indignation. Also I definitely get that worry, but I don't think you're missing anything. :)
Pimea Feenixdark0feenix on April 19th, 2009 08:31 pm (UTC)
I read the book some years ago and hated it. So glad to know I'm not alone. :)
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: Art: black catscoradh on April 20th, 2009 08:35 pm (UTC)
OMFG ME TOO! :D
goddessrissgoddessriss on April 19th, 2009 10:42 pm (UTC)
I ♥ you so much. You say what you see.
every Starbucks should have a polar bear: Art: maskscoradh on April 20th, 2009 08:36 pm (UTC)
True. :D I was a little burned of late, as you know, so every comment on this 'spiritual' book I was expecting to be a lambasting of my POV. So. I'm glad they haven't been, so far!

Edited at 2009-04-20 08:36 pm (UTC)
goddessrissgoddessriss on April 20th, 2009 11:10 pm (UTC)
Heh. I think these are the best type of book review as they are the most truthful and not particularly bothered with how 'worthy' the book allegedly is... there're few things annoy me as quickly as book or film reviews that are practically screaming 'This is dull! But I daren't say I hate it or folk will think me a philistine!' :D Me, I'll read any old rubbish and will 'fess up to having a stash of 'seriously depressed and miserable mood' Mills and Boons hidden under the bed. I hide them purely to avoid the gales of laughter which issue from my husband every time he falls over one. Obviously. ;-)