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19 August 2009 @ 06:25 pm
#44  
Young Miles, Lois McMaster Bujold
(technically The Warrior's Apprentice, The Mountains of Mourning and The Vor Game)

Eh. I'm not sure what to say about these stories. I enjoyed them, but there was always something missing.



Maybe I have leftover Cordelia-hates-Barrayar POV from Cordelia's Honour. Maybe I didn't like the way the plots sort of drifted. Maybe I'm just not all that fond of tales that laud the military. Maybe Bujold's vision for Miles, explained in her a/n, is just so very different to how he comes across on the page. Maybe I wanted more emotion. I can't tell. Regardless, I'll eventually get round to the next anthology, but I won't kill myself doing it.

(PLEASE DON'T SPOIL ME, EITHER.)

I did like this quote, though:

"Ensign Vorkosigan," Illyan sighed. "It seems you still have a little problem with insubordination."
"I know, sir. I'm sorry."
"Do you ever intend to do anything about it besides feel sorry?"


It was at this point - two pages from the end - that I realised what Miles was supposed to be, as opposed to what he was. He's a bit of Gary-Stu; I hope in further tales one of his unplanned acts of daring actually does blow up in his face.



Previously, on Book Glomp 2009:
He Knew He Was Right, Anthony Trollope |The Bostonians, Henry James | For Whom the Bell Tolls, Ernest Hemingway | For Esme - with Love and Squalor, JD Salinger | The Outsider, Albert Camus | The Princess Diaries: Ten out of Ten, Meg Cabot | The Vicar of Bullhampton, Anthony Trollope | Molesworth, Geoffrey Willans | Villette, Charlotte Bronte | The Portrait of a Lady, Henry James | The Way of All Flesh, Samuel Butler | Cecilia, Fanny Burney | The Catcher in the Rye, JD Salinger | The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Muriel Spark | Breakfast of Champions, Kurt Vonnegut | Valley of the Dolls, Jacqueline Susann | Siddhartha, Herman Hesse | The White Tiger, Aravind Adiga | The Duke and I, Julia Quinn | Brave New World, Aldous Huxley | North and South, Elizabeth Gaskell | Cider with Rosie, Laurie Lee | Catch-22, Joseph Heller | Bright Shiny Morning, James Frey | Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck | The Demon's Lexicon, Sarah Rees Brennan | The Age of Innocence, Edith Wharton | jPod, Douglas Coupland | 'Are these my basoomas I see before me?', Louise Rennison | Faro's Daughter, Georgette Heyer | Anansi Boys, Neil Gaiman | The Accidental Sorcerer, K.E. Mills | Ethan of Athos, Lois McMaster Bujold | V., Thomas Pynchon | The Old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway | The Dragon Keeper, Robin Hobb | Orlando, Virginia Woolf | The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath | Snuff, Chuck Palahniuk | Crush, Richard Siken | Trust Me, I'm a Junior Doctor, Max Pemberton | The Dice Man, Luke Rhinehart | Call Me By Your Name, Andre Aciman
 
 
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Current Music: let it rock // kevin rudolph, lil wayne
 
 
 
pale pubescent beastwildestranger on August 19th, 2009 05:39 pm (UTC)
I've just finished reading all of them (well, there's one left, I'm saving it) and I really enjoyed them. I liked Miles, although his characterisation develops more in the later books - I like the fact that he is amused by himself, and makes fun of himself, and is still desperately himself. There is something very appealing about a character who knows him/herself very well, and knows how to deal with her/his own weirdnesses. Miles's dealings with Barrayar I find interesting because he both sees the foolishness of the whole Vor thing - as Cordelia's son, I doubt he could not - but still has to engage with it, because he is Vor and a Barrayaran and therefore he must. I like people who embrace their own eccentricities.
Amanuensis: if I die (pinkwitch09)amanuensis1 on August 20th, 2009 12:01 am (UTC)
I read the books in the order they were published, not in the order they fall chronologically, and though Shards of Honor failed to grab me (I wanted to spank both the leads; they refused to take anything seriously) I was urged to give the second book a try, which was The Warrior's Apprentice, and that was the one which sold me. Miles made sense even if his parents didn't, at the time.
betony11betony11 on September 18th, 2009 01:29 am (UTC)
I would advise you to continue to read the Vorkosigan
books. Interesting things happen and Bujold continues to develop Miles's character.