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26 December 2009 @ 12:47 pm
#59  
A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens

I READ A DICKENS AND I LIKED IT! (Hope my real favourite authors don't mind it.)

It also happens to be the first book I read on my SONY READER, which has not lost its novelty yet! Particularly as I downloaded forty books from Project Gutenburg yesterday, any of which might have taken me years to get around to buying. (Alice in Wonderland! The Prince! Thus Spake Zarathustra!) I finished it on Christmas Day, too, despite the distraction of terrible TV at the terrible relatives' house.

I can't really say much about the story, because I knew it backwards anyway, but the writing surprised me in being witty. And none of it dragged! Do you think ol' Dicky got a ghostwriter for this one? Regardless, oh ye Dickens fans, if he wrote any others like this make haste to rec them to me.



Some lols:

Mind! I don't mean to say that I know, of my own knowledge, what there is particularly dead about a door-nail. I might have been inclined, myself, to regard a coffin-nail as the deadest piece of ironmongery in the trade.

like a bad lobster in a dark cellar.

"This is the even-handed dealing of the world!" he said. "There is nothing on which it is so hard as poverty; and there is nothing it professes to condemn with such severity as the pursuit of wealth!"

See, I liked unrepentant Scrooge better. I haven't been able to stop analysing everything I thought to be Right since I read Atlas Shrugged.

"They are not torn down!" cried Scrooge, folding one of his bed-curtains in his arms.

I actually felt empathy with Scrooge at this point, although I couldn't help remembering that he was so delighted about a material possession.

Really, for a man who had been out of practice for many years, it was a splendid laugh, a most illustrious laugh. The father of a long, long line of brilliant laughs!

And on that note, I end.



Previously, on Book Glomp 2009:
He Knew He Was Right, Anthony Trollope |The Bostonians, Henry James | For Whom the Bell Tolls, Ernest Hemingway | For Esme - with Love and Squalor, JD Salinger | The Outsider, Albert Camus | The Princess Diaries: Ten out of Ten, Meg Cabot | The Vicar of Bullhampton, Anthony Trollope | Molesworth, Geoffrey Willans | Villette, Charlotte Bronte | The Portrait of a Lady, Henry James | The Way of All Flesh, Samuel Butler | Cecilia, Fanny Burney | The Catcher in the Rye, JD Salinger | The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Muriel Spark | Breakfast of Champions, Kurt Vonnegut | Valley of the Dolls, Jacqueline Susann | Siddhartha, Herman Hesse | The White Tiger, Aravind Adiga | The Duke and I, Julia Quinn | Brave New World, Aldous Huxley | North and South, Elizabeth Gaskell | Cider with Rosie, Laurie Lee | Catch-22, Joseph Heller | Bright Shiny Morning, James Frey | Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck | The Demon's Lexicon, Sarah Rees Brennan | The Age of Innocence, Edith Wharton | jPod, Douglas Coupland | 'Are these my basoomas I see before me?', Louise Rennison | Faro's Daughter, Georgette Heyer | Anansi Boys, Neil Gaiman | The Accidental Sorcerer, K.E. Mills | Ethan of Athos, Lois McMaster Bujold | V., Thomas Pynchon | The Old Man and the Sea, Ernest Hemingway | The Dragon Keeper, Robin Hobb | Orlando, Virginia Woolf | The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath | Snuff, Chuck Palahniuk | Crush, Richard Siken | Trust Me, I'm a Junior Doctor, Max Pemberton | The Dice Man, Luke Rhinehart | Call Me By Your Name, Andre Aciman | Young Miles, Lois McMaster Bujold | He's Just Not That Into You, Greg Behrendt and Liz Tuccillo | The Fountainhead, Ayn Rand | A Classical Education, Caroline Taggart | The Way We Live Now, Anthony Trollope | Two Cures for Love, Wendy Cope | Unseen Academicals, Terry Pratchett | Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand | Diary, Chuck Palahniuk | Vanity Fair, William Makepeace Thackeray | ♥ A Suitable Boy, Vikram Seth | A Moveable Feast, Ernest Hemingway | Gulliver's Travels, Jonathan Swift | Castle in the Air, Diana Wynne Jones | Anything for Love, Sarah Webb
 
 
 
Merit: Artmeritjubet on December 26th, 2009 04:49 pm (UTC)
Being paid for the word kills Dickens for me. I can't help but feel that the books should be shorter. Plus the Victorian morality can get somewhat tiresome.
every Starbucks should have a polar bearscoradh on December 26th, 2009 06:50 pm (UTC)
I will never forget the pain of Nicholas Nickelby - never! But this almost reads as something he wrote for himself, it's cute and short and sweet. Although yes, morally speaking, I'm all for bad!Scrooge.
a kid on the lookout for transcendenceextemporally on December 27th, 2009 12:18 am (UTC)
He wasn't actually paid by the word, though...
Allikaallika on January 2nd, 2010 07:27 am (UTC)
Dickens and I have a strange relationship. My favorite "real literature" book is A Tale of Two Cities, but when I first started the book, I HATED it. But, by the end, I was in love. I've hated all of his novels when I first begin them...they do drag on, but then I get totally caught up in it...just takes a little while. (I still hate Great Expectations, though).
every Starbucks should have a polar bearscoradh on January 2nd, 2010 03:37 pm (UTC)
I thought Great Expectations was okay. I'm just depressed at the THOUGHT of some of those huge ones, like Bleak House and Little Dorrit. Did he ever write anything NICE?